27Aug

A Reset

So this happened.

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Adam’s birthday is always a reset for me. His birthday kicks off school and then the rest of the birthdays roll in a few months later. I always feel the need to soak him up and sniff his head more than usual. His birth story never ceases to take my breath away and make me want to wrap him up and put him in my pocket.

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We celebrated him in typical Vitafam fashion: with food. He started picking his birthday meals back in March, so he had plenty of time to think of every detail. He requested steak and mashed potatoes with orange juice. The rest of us had hamburgers. But we were all happy.

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He’s looked like this ever since his birthday: shiny new headphones with new ipod on and doing the puzzle ball that Meme got him. (Those things drive me nuts. I just end up throwing the whole ball across the room.)

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Meanwhile, we started school. One of our co-ops started early, so we did, too. The first week was tough as we all adjusted to the new schedule and new curriculum choices. But at the end of the week, I felt pretty good about the year ahead.

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Especially because this kid started co-op. That’s right – all seven kids were in co-op. And Andrew and I… were not. Can I get a HALLELUJAH?

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Finn has been begging to go to co-op since he could speak. He handled it like a champ and is already telling us all the things he’s learning over dinner.

If you’re curious about the curriculum we’re using this year, I did a Facebook Live chat last week showing you all the new stuff, plus the repeats. You can check out the video plus all of our choices on the School Life Page.

If you have any questions or you like the Facebook Live format, let me know and I’m happy to try it again. Maybe we can interview Andrew about MEP math. Which will always make me think of Beaker from the Muppets whenever I say it.

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MEEP, MEEP, y’all.

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Free the Dinosaurs!!

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I’ve got a few Finn funnies I’ve been saving, and if I don’t type them up right now, I’m afraid they’ll fall out of my head. Because it’s like swiss cheese up there. It’s so bad, I review these little items over and over in my head at night so I won’t forget them. Perhaps if I’d just WRITE THEM DOWN IN THE FIRST PLACE I wouldn’t give myself such a healthy case of insomnia.

Motherhood, man. It’s self-induced insanity. And where I’m not making my own self crazy, these people are doing what they can to push me over the edge.

About five months ago, Andrew took Finn with him to Tractor Supply to get some dog food. While they were there, Finn discovered Tractor Supply carried a collection of plastic dinosaurs and came home Full On Mad that Andrew wouldn’t buy him any. We heard about those dinosaurs All Weekend Long, much to our dismay.

And he kept it up for months.

Every time we drove past Tractor Supply – “That’s where the dinosaurs live.”

Every. Time.

He’s been angling to get more plastic dinosaurs or farm animals ever since. He’s dragged Gran and Pops to Walmart to try and sweet talk them into buying him something. And since he suddenly has more tiny animals than he did before, I’m thinking they caved while we were in Vegas.

But he never let up about the dinosaurs at Tractor Supply. In fact, a few weeks ago, he came to me with his two chubby fists tightly clenched. “I found some monies, Mommy. Now we can go get the dinosaurs!”

“How much money did you find, Finn?”

He proudly held out his hand. “Two pennies and a knuckle!”

When I’d finished wheeze-laughing, I explained that wasn’t quite enough and he’s been fretting and snitching pennies ever since.

A few days ago, he asked Andrew, “Don’t you need to go get some dog food, Daddy?”

“Probably. Why?”

“We can go to the Tractor Supply. The dinosaurs miss me.”

“They do?”

“Mm-hmm. We can free the dinosaurs!”

(It’s possible we’ve listened to too much Hamilton the Musical around here. He’s become a revolutionary.)

Because we really did need dog food, Andrew and Finn made a trip to Tractor Supply. I asked how Andrew was going to avoid buying a dinosaur. Andrew said, “Simple. I’m not.”

Seven kids, y’all. We are tired and weak-willed.

When they returned, Finn was proudly clutching his liberated Kentrosaurus. Andrew said he carefully lined them all up and decided which dinosaur he would be setting free that day. Then they removed the dinosaur’s “shackles” by taking off his tags. He introduced “Kentry” to all his other dinosaurs and animals and he’s had them lined up on the fireplace ever since.

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When he’s not playing with his dinosaurs, he’s studying.

Seriously.

Don’t hand him a book of stories or fiction, he’s not interested. But hand him a book of maps and he’s good for a half hour or so. Especially if he can hold you captive and make you tell him where everybody lives.

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His current favorite to study is the new science book we’ll be using for co-op this year. He’s already learned the lungs, the heart, the spine, and the skull. He turns the pages and points to every picture. “What’s this? Why?”

We’ve “read” the book several times through already. So when I found him with his pants off studying his “bits,” it shouldn’t have surprised me when he pointed out, “Look, Mommy, there’s a vein. That carries blood.”

Well. Of course it does.

I showed him all the veins in his hands and feet so he doesn’t have to pull his pants down to show off his knowledge in the future.

May God have mercy on us all…

Lest you think it’s all brains and no toddler fits over here, let me reassure you: He still has his moments. The other day, he got a hangnail. He was mightily upset, mostly because he didn’t like having a piece of skin hanging off his hand, but he couldn’t stand to have it pulled off. Dilemmas, dilemmas.

We were sitting outside, waiting for Andrew to come home. To stop the fit, I let him know that Daddy was just around the corner and he should sit and wait to tell Daddy about it. His whining immediately stopped and he said, “Alright. I’ll just go sit over here with my piece of skin and wait for Daddy.”

And he did.

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If only I could manage to stop whining about my problems as quickly as that. Four year olds. They’re resilient little revolutionaries…

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